V.V.F.

art / comics / culture / occult

denisforkas:

Mythological sketches (The Philosopher/Dionysian Mysteries/Διόνυσος), 2012
Ink, acrylics, chalk and bodycolour on paper, 41.5 x 29.5 cm

Tagged #artists on tumblr  #denis forkas  

Posted on 20 April, 2014
Reblogged from denisforkas  

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from greengoddessemporium  Source mysteriesoftheworm

Tagged #sculpture  #damn  

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from sarkos  Source fer1972

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from ihavenohonor  Source cross-connect

"Warlocks."

hastecrimes:

victoria-vacuus:

theheadlesshashasheen:

homesteadilee:

homesteadilee:

theheadlesshashasheen:

Oh, look, the hyper-masculine “I can’t be associated with a gender neutral term that people mistakenly associate with women” thing hasn’t ended.

I betcha they’ll start rambling about how much “manly witchcraft” has been “lost” again, given time.

Sweet, thank you! I wish I had a gif appropriate for this! 

(Actually… just refer to any of the ones I reblogged last night. Dilandau is basically me with no filters….)

'Eh. Just Google “reclaiming warlock.” The blog entries I'm seeing aren't the ones I objected to years ago when the trend started up, and I feel bad mocking them.

And actually, I think any gif from the movie Warlock will work. haha. Particularly the scene where he runs into the kid that ends up being a flying ointment. (Note: the movie features an extremely homophobic murder scene, and isn’t necessarily recommended as something to watch.)

That scene is really interesting to me because the murder is pretty homoerotic in itself…like, I could easily imagine a femme fatale taking the same course of action. The warlock does eventually murder that New Age woman who crushes on him too, right? Or she gets possessed by some horrible demon or something. I forget, lol.

Not to mention all the foot bondage the Warlock has to deal with. 

(I can’t fucking believe I couldn’t find a screencap of that.) 

Also : those dudes are fucking lame. 

I hereby decree you cannot be a misogynist and a witch at the same time.

so yeah, let them be warlocks, fedora level nerf grade magic, have fun little dudes. 

Tagged #witchcraft  #co-signed  

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from hastecrimes  Source theheadlesshashasheen

"In 1576 Elizabeth Dunlop, from Lyne, claimed she met a number of ghosts: the ghosts of Thomas Reid, said to have died at the battle of Pinkie in 1547, and the Laird of Auchenskeith. In 1605 Patrick Lawrie, from Dundonald, claimed that he met the spirit of Helena MacBurnie, although he did not say who she was. Janet Morrison confessed that she met the ghost of Adam Kerr in 1662. The spirits claimed to have been met by women from Culross in 1675 were all given names – Peter Solloway, Peter Drysdale and Laurie Moir. It is not clear if they were thought to be the spirits of dead men known to the individuals or just some other form of spirits who had rather prosaic names. More categorically, in 1677 Margaret Jackson claimed that she met the spirit, or ghost, of her dead husband, Thomas Stewart. Like others, Jackson had known the spirit in real life."

—  Joyce Miller on Men in Black: Appearances of the Devil in Early Modern Scottish Witchcraft Discourse in Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave MacMillan anthology). P. 158. (via theheadlesshashasheen)

Tagged #witchcraft  #suitable familiars  

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from theheadlesshashasheen  

"There are far fewer references to the Devil as a female than as male: 26 in all, although this increases to 32 if Devil as female fairy is also included. There is less variation in the appearance of the Devil as female: two wore green, one wore white, one appeared like the accused herself, another woman had a black pot, and four were recorded as Queen of Elves. Alison Pierson, Andrew Man, Isobel Goudie and Jean Weir all mentioned meeting the Queen of Elves. Although two of these references are from the sixteenth century – Pierson (1588) and Man (1598) – it is clear that the concept of the Queen of Elves did not disappear in the seventeenth century, as the other two references came from 1661 and 1670."

—  Joyce Miller on Men in Black: Appearances of the Devil in Early Modern Scottish Witchcraft Discourse in Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave MacMillan anthology). P. 154. (via theheadlesshashasheen)

Tagged #witchcraft  #fairies  

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from theheadlesshashasheen  

"The colour green was often associated with misfortune rather than sin. It was also frequently associated with fairy or elfin figures of some form, which were perceived to be demonic. In many cases it was not always stated categorically by the accused or recorded accurately by officials that what was meant was an elf or fairy: some descriptions would simply refer to ‘a man in green’. If all references to green were taken to indicate fairy belief then this would alter the statistical analysis slightly, increasing the appearance of the Devil in the form of fairies to 40 references."

—  Joyce Miller on Men in Black: Appearances of the Devil in Early Modern Scottish Witchcraft Discourse in Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave MacMillan anthology). P. 150. (via theheadlesshashasheen)

Tagged #witchcraft  #fairies  

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from theheadlesshashasheen  

"The description of the male Devil was not uniform. The most common was as a black man or dressed in black, which was mentioned in 81 out of 392 occasions. It is not clear if the term black man referred to a man in black clothing, a man with black hair or one whose skin was black. Where clothing was specified, black was cited most frequently, with 51 references. Green was the next most common, with 23 mentions, followed by blue with 21. Grey accounted for nine references; white and brown were mentioned on five and four occasions respectively."

—  Joyce Miller on Men in Black: Appearances of the Devil in Early Modern Scottish Witchcraft Discourse in Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave MacMillan anthology). P. 149. (via theheadlesshashasheen)

Assuming that the trial record actually included the words “black as an Aethiope,” I always assumed that Gowdie’s incubus was black-skinned. But I’m sure there was a lot of variety in these apparitions in general.

Tagged #witchcraft  

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from theheadlesshashasheen  

"Warlocks."

theheadlesshashasheen:

homesteadilee:

homesteadilee:

theheadlesshashasheen:

Oh, look, the hyper-masculine “I can’t be associated with a gender neutral term that people mistakenly associate with women” thing hasn’t ended.

I betcha they’ll start rambling about how much “manly witchcraft” has been “lost” again, given time.

Sweet, thank you! I wish I had a gif appropriate for this! 

(Actually… just refer to any of the ones I reblogged last night. Dilandau is basically me with no filters….)

'Eh. Just Google “reclaiming warlock.” The blog entries I'm seeing aren't the ones I objected to years ago when the trend started up, and I feel bad mocking them.

And actually, I think any gif from the movie Warlock will work. haha. Particularly the scene where he runs into the kid that ends up being a flying ointment. (Note: the movie features an extremely homophobic murder scene, and isn’t necessarily recommended as something to watch.)

That scene is really interesting to me because the murder is pretty homoerotic in itself…like, I could easily imagine a femme fatale taking the same course of action. The warlock does eventually murder that New Age woman who crushes on him too, right? Or she gets possessed by some horrible demon or something. I forget, lol.

Posted on 19 April, 2014
Reblogged from theheadlesshashasheen  

"one of the most persistent and attractive glamours is that of the magician as an ‘outsider’ figure. many people who are attracted to magic want to think of themselves as outsiders—individuals who stand beyond the boundaries of everyday society, separated from everyone else by dint of their ‘knowledge of the mysteries.’ unfortunately, thinking of oneself as an ‘outsider’ can become an excuse for not getting one’s act together. the ‘outsider stance’ can often be equated with no direction, low quality of life, no social skills, unrealistic self-expectations and a huge chip on one’s shoulder. addiction to those virulent memes, Being Right and Getting Even is also common amongst wannabe Outsiders. the other main problem with being an Outsider is that one needs something to be outside of. again this pulls the individual back into dualistic opposition-oriented thinking habits. having to have an enemy against which to define yourself, be it society, an imaginary black lodge that is psychically attacking you; mehums; the masses; robotniks; proles or whatever term used, hides, I think, a nagging insecurity. if you see yourself in opposition to that other, then it’s all too easy to think of yourself as being superior to them, and the more you have to be superior, the less able you are to admit to having personal faults and weaknesses, or even that other people may be as complex and interesting as you are. this kind of arrogance is all too common, and not therefore, as elite as its exponents fondly imagine themselves to be."

—  Phil Hine (via courier5)

Tagged #occult  #witchcraft  #phil hine  

Posted on 18 April, 2014
Reblogged from chirotus  Source courier5


The Angel of the Darker Drink by Katrine Bingham / Cumbres Borrascosas (1847) -Emily Brontë

Posted on 18 April, 2014
Reblogged from inkwellillustration  


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